Location [Stds. 1, 3]
Place [Stds. 4, 7, 9, 10]
Human-Environment Interaction [Stds. 8, 12, 14-18]
Movement [Stds. 11, 13]
Regions [Stds. 2, 5, 6]


 Standard 2: Using Mental Maps
to Organize Information

How to use mental maps to organize information
about people, places, and environments in a spatial context

STANDARD 2 INTRODUCTION: MENTAL MAPS AND GEOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS

We all carry in our heads "mental maps" of the world we encounter. For some, these maps are quite complex and detailed, but for most the patterns we carry within the mind are at best a sketchy outline of the world as our mind organizes it.

We use these maps to navigate daily from place to place, and they help us frame information we glean from television, the Internet, and reading into patterns that make sense to us.
Our minds constantly revise and summarize these maps as understanding deepens and information is gained. Mental maps include objective, actual information, as well as more subjective, often imprecise perceptions we have.
// CASE STUDY: MENTAL MAPS OF EURASIA, ASIA, AND EAST ASIA
  1. Where is "Asia"? And what constitutes "Asia"?
  2. Does Europe actually exist as a separate continent? Is there a "myth of continents"?
  3. What does "East" Asia signify?
KEY READINGS