Location [Stds. 1, 3]
Place [Stds. 4, 7, 9, 10]
Human-Environment Interaction [Stds. 8, 12, 14-18]
Movement [Stds. 11, 13]
Regions [Stds. 2, 5, 6]


 Standard 11: Patterns and Networks
of Economic Interdependence

The patterns and networks of economic interdependence on earth's surface

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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STANDARD 11 INTRODUCTION: HIGHLIGHTING GLOBAL INTERDEPENDENCE

Examining the geographic aspects of economic activity in general, Standard 11 highlights global interdependence — a fundamentally geographic topic that has emerged at the beginning of the 21st century as a critically important aspect of understanding the world.

Comparative economic advantage, trade networks, and communication innovations are all subject to useful geographic interpretation. Each is clarified when the facts are presented on maps and reveal that economic interdependence between East Asia and the West predates the modern period, as in the following specific cases:

  • Asia's silk roads;
  • Triangular trade routes of the 16th and 17th centuries;
  • The Age of Exploration and the Age of Colonialization that connected Europe with Asia
  • Made in Asia: China, Japan, and Korea as workshops for global markets.
CASE STUDY: CHINA'S REGIONS AND INTRA-REGIONAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS

In approaching the complexity of China, Robert W. McColl's article Understanding the Geography of China: An Assemblage of Pieces** [Education about Asia] provides the most important information needed to understand the regional subdivisions of China, with useful cues as to how to remember the "pieces" and their relationships to each other. This article is also used in Standard 4 of this unit.

[** Robert W. McColl wrote two different articles under this title. One, linked above, is an illustrated article published in Education about Asia, vol. 4, no 2, Fall 1999. The second article appears as a background essay (PDF) in the Asia Society's Teacher's Guide to the exhibit Visible Traces: Rare Books and Special Collections from the National Library of China. This background essay provides additional information on the same topics that are discussed in the EAA article, but has no visuals. Teachers and students may want to read both articles to get a fuller understanding of China's diversity. See the "Economic activities and resources today" sections of the Asia Society version for an understanding of economic interdependence within China. ]

The following maps can be used to illustrate McColl's article:

1) Regional map of China, showing all the regions mentioned in McColl's article, except the Yunnan-Guizhou area, which is west of the southwest upland region. 2) Map of the Grand Canal, also not shown on Map 1.

CASE STUDY: THE SILVER TRADE IN EAST ASIA, 1400s TO THE 1800s (CHINA–JAPAN–LATIN AMERICA–EUROPE)
READING: China and Europe: 1500-1800, The Silver Trade [Asia for Educators]
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