Expand All Topics | Collapse All Topics
CHINA: HISTORY-ARCHAEOLOGY
Ming Dynasty (1368-1644)

Video Unit Social Policy and Social Practice in Ming and Qing [Open Learning Initiative, Harvard Extension School]
Video Unit Silver and Social Change in Late Ming [Open Learning Initiative, Harvard Extension School]
Lectures 18 and 19 of 37 from the Harvard Open Learning Initiative course, China: Traditions and Transformations. These 50-minute lecture presentations, each with an accompanying slide presentation that can be controlled separately, are part of an introductory course on China for undergraduates at Harvard. Taught by two of the leading scholars of the China field — professors Peter Bol and William Kirby — the presentations provide background for teachers and students alike. Suitable for secondary school classrooms, especially AP-World History courses. (The link above leads to the main course page listing all 37 lectures. Scroll to Lecture 18: Social Policy and Social Practice in Ming and Qing and Lecture 19: Silver and Social Change in Late Ming and select a connection type to view or listen to these lectures.)

Overview Maps Dynasties of China [The Genographic Project: Atlas of the Human Journey, NationalGeographic.com]
Eight small maps displayed together, showing China's eight major dynasties from the Shang to the Qing. The maps are very small, but shown together and with text summarizing the history of all eight dynasties, they effectively provide an excellent overview of China's history from ca. 1750 B.C.E. to today. Site removed at NGS temporarily; check back.

Printable Map Maps of Chinese Dynasties: Ming Dynasty [The Art of Asia, Minneapolis Institute of Arts]
Color map showing land ruled by China's Ming dynasty relative to present-day political boundaries. Can be downloaded as a .pdf file.

Interactive MapMing Dynasty, 1368–1644 [Princeton University Art Museum]
An excellent brief overview of the Ming dynasty. With six related art objects, all with lengthy descriptions, and an interactive map with an excellent COMPARE feature that allows the user to select any two dynastic periods in Chinese history and compare them by moving from one map to the other.

| back to top |

Qing Dynasty (1644-1912)

Overview Maps Dynasties of China [The Genographic Project: Atlas of the Human Journey, NationalGeographic.com]
Eight small maps displayed together, showing China's eight major dynasties from the Shang to the Qing. The maps are very small, but shown together and with text summarizing the history of all eight dynasties, they effectively provide an excellent overview of China's history from ca. 1750 B.C.E. to today. Site removed at NGS temporarily; check back.

Printable Map Maps of Chinese Dynasties: Ch'ing (Qing) Dynasty [The Art of Asia, Minneapolis Institute of Arts]
Color map showing land ruled by China's Qing dynasty relative to present-day political boundaries. Can be downloaded as a .pdf file.

Interactive MapQing Dynasty, 1644–1912 [Princeton University Art Museum]
An excellent brief overview of the Qing dynasty. With four related art objects, all with lengthy descriptions, and an interactive map with an excellent COMPARE feature that allows the user to select any two dynastic periods in Chinese history and compare them by moving from one map to the other.

Splendors of China's Forbidden City: The Glorious Reign of Emperor Qianlong [The Field Museum]
Online presentation of a 2004 traveling exhibition developed in cooperation with the Palace Museum in Beijing. With a video introduction to the exhibition, plus a gallery of images organized under the following topics: 1) Symbols of Power; 2) Effective Leadership; 3) Family Life; 4) The Private World of the Emperor; 5) Religion. Also a Q&A section with eleven commonly asked questions about Imperial China.

MapsRecording the Grandeur of the Qing [Columbia University and The Metropolitan Museum of Art]
This interactive teaching unit gives the viewer unprecedented access to four monumental artworks of the Qing period — four of the twenty-four southern inspection tour scrolls commissioned by the Qing emperors Kangxi (r. 1662-1722) and Qianlong (r. 1736-1795). Each of the four featured scrolls is displayed online in its entirety, with key details annotated by Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Maxwell K. Hearn. Five background essays by Dr. Hearn and Columbia history professor Madeleine Zelin serve as guides to the historical and artistic context in which the scrolls were created. Topics discussed at length include: the reigns of the two emperors who commissioned the scrolls, Kangxi and Qianlong, as well as key aspects of the Qing government, economy, and art.

| back to top |

RELIGION, PHILOSOPHY, THOUGHT
Neo-Confucianism during the Ming

Focus on Neo-Confucianism for the World History Curriculum [World History Connected]
A brief introduction to neo-Confucianism — "the renaissance of Confucianism during the Song dynasty."

Wang Yangming, 1472-1529
Primary Source w/DBQs
Wang Yangming on the Unity of Knowing and Acting [PDF] [Asia for Educators]
Primary Source w/DBQsThe Identification of Mind and Principle [PDF] [Asia for Educators]

| back to top |

Books of Moral Instruction, Ming and Qing

Yuan Huang, 1533-1606
Primary Source w/DBQs
Excerpt from Ledger of Merit and Demerit [PDF] [Asia for Educators]

Primary Source w/DBQsSelections from The Twenty-four Exemplars of Filial Piety [PDF] [Asia for Educators]

Primary Source w/DBQsSelections from Meritorious Deeds at No Cost [PDF] [Asia for Educators]

| back to top |

Christianity Enters China

Yang Guangxian, 1597-1669
Primary Source w/DBQs
I Cannot Do Otherwise (Budeyi) [PDF] [Asia for Educators]

Zhang Xingyao, 1633-c. 1715
Primary Source w/DBQs
An Examination of the Similarities and Differences Between the Lord of Heaven Teaching (Christianity) and the Teaching of the Confucian Scholars [PDF] [Asia for Educators]

Fusion 1700: Wonders of the Time, A Forum on Chinese-Western Relations through Christianity in the Ming-Qing Period [The Ricci Institute for Chinese-Western Cultural History, University of San Francisco]
The full text of lectures given at a December 2000 public forum at the Oakland Museum of California, featuring a panel of scholars from the Ricci Institute: Eugenio Menegon ("Shooting for the Stars: The Jesuits at the Qing Court"); Mark Mir ("The Mechanics of Heaven: The Jesuits and Sino-Western Technology"); and Paul Rule ("Fusion of Confusion? Learning the 'Grammar' of the Chinese Object").

Also see Astronomy: The Jesuits in China in the Technology, Inventions, Science section, below.

| back to top |

GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION
Provincial and Imperial Government under the Qing

Reign of Qing emperors Kangxi (r. 1662-1722) and Yongzheng (r. 1723-1735)
Primary Source w/DBQs
The Qing Dynasty "Sacred Edict" [PDF] [Asia for Educators]
Primary Source w/DBQsWang Youpu's Sacred Edict Lecture: "Exhortations on Ceremony and Deference" [PDF] [Asia for Educators]

Lan Dingyuan, 1680-1733
Primary Source w/DBQs
Excerpts from The Casebook of the County Magistrate Lan Dingyuan: “Depraved Religious Sects Deceive People” [PDF] [Asia for Educators]

Chen Hongmou, 1696-1771
Primary Source w/DBQs
On the Duties of an Official [PDF] [Asia for Educators]
Primary Source w/DBQsOn Substantive Learning [PDF] [Asia for Educators]

| back to top |

TECHNOLOGY, INVENTIONS, SCIENCE
Astronomy: The Jesuits in China

Lesson Plan + DBQs Exchange of Goods and Ideas along the Silk Roads >> West-East Exchange: Astronomy [PDF] [China Institute]
Unit K from the curriculum guide From Silk to Oil: Cross-cultural Connections along the Silk Roads, which provides a comprehensive view of the Silk Roads from the second century BCE to the contemporary period. "What was the importance of astronomy to the pre-modern Chinese state and people? How did the West-East exchange of scientific information along the Silk Roads affect China? Students will study pre-modern Chinese ideas on the relation of the cosmos to everyday life and the political importance of astronomy. They will look at phenomena such as eclipses and supernovae through both (modern) Western and (pre-modern) Chinese eyes."

Fusion 1700: Wonders of the Time, A Forum on Chinese-Western Relations through Christianity in the Ming-Qing Period [The Ricci Institute for Chinese-Western Cultural History, University of San Francisco]
The full text of lectures given at a December 2000 public forum at the Oakland Museum of California, featuring a panel of scholars from the Ricci Institute: Eugenio Menegon ("Shooting for the Stars: The Jesuits at the Qing Court"); Mark Mir ("The Mechanics of Heaven: The Jesuits and Sino-Western Technology"); and Paul Rule ("Fusion of Confusion? Learning the 'Grammar' of the Chinese Object").

| back to top |

ECONOMY, WORK, TRADE, FOREIGN RELATIONS
Analyzing China's Advanced Economy

China and Europe, 1500-1800 [Asia for Educators]
Part of the teaching module China and Europe: 1500-2000 and Beyond, with consultants Ken Pomeranz (Professor of History, University of California at Irvine) and R. Bin Wong (Professor of History, University of California at Los Angeles). The section on 1500-1800 compares the economies of China and Europe during this period, focusing specifically on China's market economy and the silver trade between China and Europe. With video interviews of the faculty experts, additional maps, images, and readings throughout.

| back to top |

SOCIETY
Homes and Gardens, Ming and Qing Periods

Homes [A Visual Sourcebook of Chinese Civilization, University of Washington]
A Visual Sourcebook of Chinese Civilization, prepared by University of Washington history professor Patricia Buckley Ebrey, is an excellent resource, with images, questions for discussion, timelines, maps, and suggested readings throughout. This particular unit examines how people constructed, decorated, and furnished their homes during the Ming, in order to gain a better understanding about the resources, aesthetic preferences, and social habits prevalent during that time.

Gardens [A Visual Sourcebook of Chinese Civilization, University of Washington]
A Visual Sourcebook of Chinese Civilization, prepared by University of Washington history professor Patricia Buckley Ebrey, is an excellent resource, with images, questions for discussion, timelines, maps, and suggested readings throughout. This particular unit discusses the origins, design, social uses, and aesthetics of Chinese garden design, which reached its fullest development during the late Ming.

| back to top |

Women

Primary Source w/DBQsSelections from The Twenty-four Exemplars of Filial Piety [PDF] [Asia for Educators]

Lu Kun, 1536-1618
Primary Source w/DBQs
Preface to Models for the Inner Quarters [Asia for Educators]

Lady Chang's Letter to Emperor Shi Zong (r. 1522-1567), ca. 1566
Primary Source + Lesson Plan + DBQ
Official Petition to the Ming Emperor Shi Zong on Behalf of Shên Shu [Women in World History, Center for History and New Media, George Mason University]

| back to top |

LITERATURE
Essays, Poems, and Fantasy Tales of the Qing

Li Yü (Li Liweng), 1611-ca. 1680
Primary Source w/DBQs
"On Being Happy Though Poor" [PDF] [Asia for Educators]

Yuan Mei, ca. 1716-ca. 1798
Primary Source w/DBQs
"On His Chair-bearers—A Case of Misplaced Sympathy" [PDF] [Asia for Educators]

Li Ju-chen, ca. 1763-ca. 1830
Primary Source w/DBQs
"In the Country of Women" [PDF] [Asia for Educators]

| back to top |

ART AND MUSIC
Painting

The Qing Dynasty (1644–1911): Painting [Timeline of Art History, The Metropolitan Museum of Art]
A discussion of painting during the Qing dynasty, with a focus on three principal groups of artists working during the Qing: the traditionalists, the individualists, and the courtiers and professional artists. With 14 related artworks.

Fine Works of the Ming and Qing Women Painters [The Palace Museum]
With paintings by twenty-seven artists active during the Ming and Qing period. With one selected work for each artist, along with brief biographical information. Several works are fan paintings.

Splendors of China's Forbidden City: The Glorious Reign of Emperor Qianlong [The Field Museum]
Online presentation of a 2004 traveling exhibition developed in cooperation with the Palace Museum in Beijing. With a video introduction to the exhibition, plus a gallery of images organized under the following topics: 1) Symbols of Power; 2) Effective Leadership; 3) Family Life; 4) The Private World of the Emperor; 5) Religion. Also a Q&A section with 11 commonly asked questions about Imperial China.

Recording the Grandeur of the Qing [Columbia University and The Metropolitan Museum of Art]
This interactive teaching unit gives the viewer unprecedented access to four monumental artworks of the Qing period — four of the twenty-four southern inspection tour scrolls commissioned by the Qing emperors Kangxi (r. 1662-1722) and Qianlong (r. 1736-1795). Each of the four featured scrolls is displayed online in its entirety, with key details annotated by Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Maxwell K. Hearn. Five background essays by Dr. Hearn and Columbia history professor Madeleine Zelin serve as guides to the historical and artistic context in which the scrolls were created. Topics discussed at length include: the reigns of the two emperors who commissioned the scrolls, Kangxi and Qianlong, as well as key aspects of the Qing government, economy, and art.

Tracing the Che School in Chinese Painting [National Palace Museum]
"The 'Che School' does not refer to a particular institution or atelier of painters, but is instead a term used to designate a group of artists who worked in a similar style in China during the 15th and 16th century, representing one of the most important painting manners of the early Ming dynasty. ... Che School painters, with strong support in the private market and patronage from the imperial family, flourished in local areas as well as the painting academy at court." A highly sophisticated multimedia website featuring hundreds of images.

Find more art-related resources for China, 1450-1750 CE
at OMuRAA (Online Museum Resources on Asian Art)

| back to top |

© 2009 Asia for Educators, Columbia University